The Morning Routines of Crazy-Successful People

610_monroe_introMy first article for Thrillist, “The Morning Routines of Crazy-Successful People” is live! Find out how Toni Morrison, Marilyn Monroe, Louis Armstrong, Gertrude Stein, Audrey Hepburn, Joan Miró, Flannery O’Conner, and Ludwig von Beethoven do mornings.

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My new Aromatherapy Yoga class at Family of Light Holistic Center

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Photo by Viktor Pachas

I can’t wait to start my new Aromatherapy Yoga class at Family of Light Holistic Center in Brooklyn. Thursday nights, 7:30-9:00, I’ll be guiding the class through asana, meditation, breathwork, and the senses using doTERRA essential oils for a relaxing and invigorating practice. I’m so excited to be part of this gorgeous community of healers, yoga practitioners, and artists. I’m also excited to say that I’m available for private yoga lessons, readings (tarot, tea leaf, and palm), energy healing (traditional Romani and Reiki Master fusion), and creative consulting.

Beat the block Southeast Review style

I like to do these little posts about beating writer’s block because writer’s block is bullshit. Right? Just write. But, it’s also a thing, and a thing I struggle with a lot, even though I supposedly love writing and have worked my ass off to do this whole writing professionally business, and it’s basically all I think about. That and puppies, and smoothies, and magic.

Here are some of my favorite ways to beat writer’s block, SER edition:

1. Visual art! The Surrealists did it, and before them the Romantics, and before them frickin’ everyone did it. Go to a museum, surf the web, make some art yourself, and check out The Southeast Review Vol 32.2 because we have two killer-great artists– Lita Cabellut and Dmitry Borshch. Both artists completely astound and inspire me. Cabellut is something of a personal hero– she’s a Romani (Gypsy) painter from Spain and her work haunts my dreams in a good way. And Borshch is one of the most striking and unusual illustrators I’ve come across in some time– his designs spring from Russian stories and some great place of blue ink creation. We’re proud to feature interviews with both artists.

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2. Read other people’s work! One of the best ways to find out what’s new and exciting in the literary world is to read more literary journals. You can drink your fill of art for free on ezines and electronic journals, but don’t forget to show your print journals some love, too. When you subscribe or order an issue, it keeps the art and the industry alive.

3. Writing prompts! The Southeast Review does these Writing Regimen packets a few times a year, and it’s a fantastic writer’s block cure, full of prompts, craft tips, and inspirational tidbits to keep your mind spinning, inspiration flowing, and words coming. All the good gerunds. The next round starts OCTOBER 1ST! Yes!

The Southeast Review Writing Regimen is for poets, essayists, and fiction writers who want to produce a body of work by introducing structure to their writing life, and, at the same time, finding new and innovative ways to approach their craft.

Sign up for The Southeast Review Writing Regimen and you will get the following:

  • daily writing prompts, applicable for any genre, emailed directly to you for 30DAYS! Use these to write a poem a day for 30 days, to create 30 short-short stories, or to give flesh to stories, personal essays, novels, and memoirs
  • a daily reading-writing exercise, where we inspire you with a short passage from the books we’re reading and get you started writing something of your own
  • A Riff Word of the Day, a Podcast of the Day from an editor, writer, or poet, and a Quote of the Day from a famous writer on writing

  • Flashback Bonus Craft Talks, where, as a little something extra, we repeat an earlier regimen’s craft talks from more writing heavyweights

  • weekly messages from established poets and writers—including tips and warnings on both the craft and the business of writing

  • a FREE copy of a current or classic back issue of The Southeast Review, featuring interviews, poetry, nonfiction, and fiction that will knock your socks off!

  • a chance to have your work published on our site.  Read the winning entry from our most recent Writer’s Regimen contest in June, “Vaquera” by Kim Henderson

  • access to our online literary companion—www.southeastreview.org—for interviews with up-and-coming and established poets, fiction writers, and memoirists, podcasts of readings from the Warehouse Reading Series, including such writers as Ann Patchett, Jennifer Knox, Matthew Zapruder, Barry Hannah, . . . as well as essays on the reading life of writers, book picks, web picks, and much more . . .”

So that’s all pretty great, and all are SER inspired to celebrate the birth of Vol. 32.2. I couldn’t be more excited.

Keep writing, friends.

Posing with a book of Shelley many years ago at Hollins University, my alma mater

Posing with a book of Shelley many years ago at Hollins University, my alma mater

Quail Bell Magazine wants to know what you do and why you do it. Here’s my deal.

I wrote this outside all at once after thinking about it almost non-stop for 3 days. So artists, writers, magic-makers, think about it: why do you do what you do? And what is it that you do? Get back to Quail Bell with a creative essay by 3/30. We all want to know. Email yours to submissions@quailbellmagazine.com

“Invocation invites manifestation” http://www.quailbellmagazine.com/3/post/2014/03/why-i-do-what-i-do-jessica-reidy.html

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I’ll be honest with you– it was an intense realization. There’s a lot more ego and angst than I like to admit mixed-up in my creative drive. There’s also an unruly amount of joy, wonder, and hallucinogenic imagination, so it evens out. All of it’s just fine.